About Siberian Husky

 

 

History and Health of the Siberian Husky Dog Breed:

 The Husky was developed in the isolated Yakutsk region of extreme northeastern Siberia by the Chukchi people, specifically to be an endurance sled dog as that was their only means of transportation. Their exact origins and ancestry are unknown, but the breed’s blood lines were kept very pure and DNA tests confirm that they are among the oldest of dog breeds. The Husky breed was introduced to Alaska in the early 1900’s. When the dogs were not working with the men, they were cared for by the women. This, in turn, brought them in close quarters with children, and only non-aggressive, well-tempered males and females were favored. They bred only the best of the best, without cross breeding to other breeds, and kept their pedigrees pure for at least 3000 years.

 

 

Personality

Siberian Huskies are pack dogs, and they need an owner who is the clear leader of the pack. This makes training easier because you will find that your dog respects you, but don't be surprised if he tests the limits of your position in the pack and tries to take control from time to time.

When this happens, it's important not to give into their pushiness. Assert yourself as leader — not by bullying or hitting — but by confirming the ground rules with clarity and consistency. Making your dog wait to eat is one of the best ways to establish your leadership role. The Husky will view you as the keeper of all valuable resources — food, treats, toys and other canine assets. Nonetheless, they can be quite charming with their mischievous and playful nature. They are also quite social and love to show off their talents.

 

 Huskies are notorious escape artists, managing to foil fences, screen doors, garages, they can jump fences, break tie-out chains, slip collars and find any other ways to escape.  and other holding devices. You should never leave your Husky unsupervised in the yard or with only a screen separating him from the wild blue yonder.

Although Huskies are adored for being friendly and gentle, they make lousy watchdogs. Unfortunately, they are not overly suspicious of strangers, including burglars. The fact is that they tend to love everybody.

 

Siberian Huskies are not recommended for apartment living, but some do quite well in apartments if they are properly trained and exercised.

Depending on your climate, Siberian Huskies are generally low shedders except during the times of year when they blow their coat, meaning they drop large amounts of hair all at once. This happens roughly twice a year, more if you live in warmer climates, and when it does, the breed becomes a heavy shedder for about a three-week stretch.

Affectionate and good natured describes the Siberian Husky. Generally, they do well with children although young children should never be left alone with any breed. They also get along with people and do well in homes with multiple dogs.
 
Huskies cannot be allowed to run off leash during walks. They will run away and will also chase other small animals.
 
        Health
 
Huskies are generally healthy, but like all breeds, they're prone to certain health conditions. Not all Huskies will get any or all of these diseases, but it's important to be aware of them if you're considering this breed.
 
 

Cataracts: A cataract is an opacity on the lens of the eye that causes difficulty in seeing. The eye(s) of the dog will have a cloudy appearance. Cataracts usually occur in old age and sometimes can be surgically removed to improve the dog's vision.

Corneal Dystrophy: This condition affects the cornea or outer transparent portion of the eyeball. It is an opacity that is caused by a collection of lipids in the cornea. It is usually seen in young adults and it generally affects more females. There is no therapy for this condition, but it does not seem to affect the vision.

Progressive Retinal Atrophy (PRA): This is a degenerative eye disorder that eventually causes blindness from the loss of photoreceptors at the back of the eye. PRA is detectable years before the dog shows any signs of blindness. Fortunately, dogs can use their other senses to compensate for blindness, and a blind dog can live a full and happy life. Just don't make it a habit to move the furniture around. Reputable breeders have their dogs' eyes certified annually by a veterinary ophthalmologist and do not breed dogs with this disease.

Size

An average male stands between 21 and 23.5 inches high while the female averages 20 to 22 inches. The male weighs between 45 and 60 pounds and the female 35 to 50 pounds


 

 

 

 

 

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